you know you’re having too many emotions when a car commercial about a dad and a daughter makes you wanna DIE but in a good way aw

getsby:

"ur bra strap is showing" u say

children begin to scream

tears r streaming down my face

my parents disown me and sell me to a shady, moustached man for three goats

no one can ever kno i wear a bra

(via colinhanks)

aquaticwonder:

Are you a piece of art because I’d like to nail you up against a wall

(via colinhanks)

(Source: ximcicihahax, via recoveryisbeautiful)

(Source: rrrrosa, via sweatersouls)

last night was so perfect this morning was so perfect spring fling is gonna be so perfect i am so happy

weedjoke420:

can’t wait till all my friends get married and have nice weddings with open bars

(via lajeune-surlefeu)

gainsandlosses:


I don’t even think you understand

gainsandlosses:

I don’t even think you understand

(Source: divinefitness, via lajeune-surlefeu)

basedheisenberg:

Real recognizes real.

basedheisenberg:

Real recognizes real.

(Source: ryanhatesthis, via muhcoochee)

(Source: lolgifs.net, via shittyblogtitle)

lyndez:

littlecatlady:

alimarko:

alimarko:

We Speak is a poster and blog campaign featuring ten young women who are speaking up about their relationships with mental health and how it informs their identities. Part of Launch: Stamps School of Art and Design’s Senior Thesis Exhibition at the University of Michigan, it will be featured at Work Gallery - Ann Arbor in the exhibition opening on Friday, April 18th from 6-9. The show will remain up through May 3rd. 

In the past year, the ten young women featured in the poster portion of We Speak came face to face with the state of our mental health. Our stories, carefully and honestly written, are meant to start a conversation about a topic that many of us wish we could ignore. But these are our realities, and in sharing them, we want to start chipping away at the stigma that often keeps us feeling weak and alone.

In addition to the original ten participants, everyone is encouraged to consider sharing their own story about mental health. By contributing your experiences, you can help open the discussion about the importance of mental health and tear down the stigma that keeps it so hidden. By sharing this project, you can foster support.

We Speak blog | More information | Submit your story | Mental health resources | By Alicia Kovalcheck

This is my senior thesis project! I’m so proud of all the beautiful courageous women who participated in this project, and I couldn’t have done this without you all.
Please reblog and spread the word, and I encourage all of you to go check out our stories and share your own!

heyyy that’s me in the last one!!! this project is mad important and Alicia worked so so hard on it, you should take a moment to check it out

(via helloosandraa)

barackobarn:

Got my dime bag read for #420

barackobarn:

Got my dime bag read for #420

(via thevaroda)

I missed a couple days of @Marylambertsing’s #bodylove days but it was especially important to me that I go back and do #lovemyhair. There’s a lot of it and it often doesn’t want to do anything I want it to do, but it has been one the hardest body love things for me to come to terms with - but I’m so glad I am ☺️

I missed a couple days of @Marylambertsing’s #bodylove days but it was especially important to me that I go back and do #lovemyhair. There’s a lot of it and it often doesn’t want to do anything I want it to do, but it has been one the hardest body love things for me to come to terms with - but I’m so glad I am ☺️

(Source: buttsandbarbells, via hanhanss)

izzashark:

On bad days,

I write about avocados. How I love when they part
in two: pit and cupped hand, bright green half -suns,
when the knife cuts clean. I have a netted bag of avocados

in the fridge. The fruit sits until its skin shrivels and pulls
away from the blackening meat. Lately I spoil everything.
The rot bores through, the seed wanders to one side in a slow ooze.

I pull plastic bags from the crisper, thick
with zucchini water. The carrots dry, then bud, then
flower. On good days I think of them as growing.

It’s less embarrassing to write about drinking too much
wine than it is to write about grapes fermenting on
a shelf in the fridge. It’s less embarrassing to be

forgetful than it is to be sad. Being sad is thick
like zucchini water and everyone is asking why
you can’t just smile at the party. Everyone is looking

at you like you’re an empty fruit stand, the stone pit
of a peach, an avocado separating from its skin.